E43 Sidecast: Centralization and the Inefficient Quest for Efficiency


De-centralization as a guideline or strategy is thought to promote innovation and greater participation. Organizations that de-centralize as a matter of course may view centralized hierarchy as old-fashioned, complacent, even ossified. So, what about the virtues of centralization? One of the main arguments for greater centralization in organizations is that it brings greater efficiency.

In this sidecast to Episode 43, Tom explores the argument behind centralization and efficiency!

E43: Centralization/Decentralization Debate - The Federalist Papers (Part 2)


The debate continues with Theme N2: "Why do organizations oscillate between centralization and decentralization, and is there a golden mean?". Join us as the podcasters shift the context to more contemporary matters. What are the benefits and risks of centralizing or de-centralizing organizations in modern times? 

E43: Centralization/Decentralization Debate - The Federalist Papers (Part 1)


How exciting! The podcasters engaging in debate over whether centralizing is better or should organizations de-centralize? Learn about how this tension shaped the early days of the United States while Ralph and Pedro face off against Dmitrijs and Tom! 

A special Thank You also goes out to Todd Bridgman and Stephen Cummings who set the tone and questions for this very first TAOP debate!

E42: Carnegie Mellon School Series (No. 5, Part 3) - Organizational Learning


Episode 42 concludes as the podcasters discuss unlearning, present their takeaways and budding research questions based on Levitt & March's review of "Organizational Learning," our fifth episode in the Carnegie-Mellon series. What would it take for organizations to learn 'better'? How might we find out? Where does collective intelligence come in?

Also see: Episode 4 on Organizational Routines, Episode 19 on Organizational Learning, Episode 29 on Business School Design, Episode 39 on Organizational Choice, and our Series Introduction.

E42: Organizational Learning - Carnegie-Mellon School Series (No. 5, Part 2)


Episode 42 continues as the podcasters debate the gaps and lingering questions in Levitt & March's review of "Organizational Learning," our fifth episode in the Carnegie-Mellon series. What did we think about the author's views on organizational memory? What about the levels of analysis used in the text? Find out our take on these and other questions.

Also see: Episode 4 on Organizational Routines, Episode 19 on Organizational Learning, Episode 29 on Business School Design, Episode 39 on Organizational Choice, and our Series Introduction.

E42: Carnegie-Mellon Series (No. 5) - Organizational Learning (Part 1)


Please join us for the fifth episode in our Carnegie-Mellon School series as the podcasters discuss Barbara Levitt and James G. March’s brilliant literature survey “Organizational Learning,” published in the Annual Review of Sociology in 1988. This work was a literature review across various streams in organizational learning up through the 1980s. Topics include learning from experience, organizational memory, ecologies of learning, and organizational intelligence. Of particular interest is how organizational learning was defined as not an outcome but a process of translating the cumulative experiences of individuals and codifying them as routines within the organization. But an important question remains three decades later – do organizations really learn? The podcasters wrestle with this question and many others in their review of this work.

Also see: Episode 4 on Organizational Routines, Episode 19 on Organizational Learning, Episode 29 on Business School Design, Episode 39 on Organizational Choice, and our Series Introduction.

E41: Images of Organization - Gareth Morgan (Part 3)


Our discussion of Gareth Morgan's Images of Organization concludes as we discuss the modern-day implications of these metaphors. How can we use metaphor to better understand the interactions of organizations in the environment, and of organization and member commitment to each other? We also discuss possible areas of future research.